North Korea has all chances to become one of Russia's new best friends

The Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) is opening trade missions in the Russian Federation. One should consider lifting UN sanctions against Pyongyang.

Freight train from North Korea to Russia

The first freight train in two years left North Korea for Russia, US research group 38 North said.

On Friday, the group released satellite imagery and cited comments from White House national security spokesman John Kirby who said on Wednesday that North Korea was supplying artillery shells to Russia. In September, Pyongyang said it had never supplied weapons to Russia and had no intention to do so.

However, Iran also denied reports on the supplies of its drone to Russia, but later admitted that it had delivered them once before the start of the special operation.

On Wednesday, Russian media also reported that railway traffic from North Korea to Russia had resumed. RIA Novosti quoted the Russian embassy in Pyongyang as saying that Russia was very interested in importing clothing and footwear from North Korea. However, the embassy stressed that such projects should be implemented "in strict accordance with the UN Security Council resolutions prohibiting the import of certain goods from the DPRK."

A high-ranking source told South Korean publication Daily NK that the DPRK started preparations for opening a trade mission in Russia. The goal is to facilitate export-import activities by establishing six offices in various parts of Russia while maintaining trade headquarters in Pyongyang, the source said.

Time to lift UN sanctions from North Korea

Undoubtedly, the time to lift sanctions against the DPRK has come. The Americans already write about it.

"We just have to see North Korea for what it is, not the way we would like it to be," Ankit Panda, senior fellow at the Carnegie Endowment said, CNN reports.

Washington should recognise North Korea as a nuclear power that has no intention to get rid of nuclear weapons, Reuters said. Afterwards, the White House may ease sanctions to encourage the country for "better behavior". This is the time when Russian diplomats are supposed to show up to develop cooperation with the DPRK.

The UN Security Council prohibited North Korea from conducting nuclear tests and ballistic missile launches. In 2006, the UN imposed sanctions against the DPRK to cut off funding for its nuclear and ballistic missile programs. Thus, exports of coal, iron, lead, textiles and seafood were banned, and imports of crude oil and petroleum products were restricted.

UN experts regularly report that North Korea continues developing its programs allegedly with China's help that conducting transactions through its banks.

Be that as it may, Pyongyang already possesses nuclear weapons, and it is unproductive to keep the DPRK as a rogue state. A way out is to accept North Korea as a nuclear member and lift sanctions. Russia should work to restore relations with the DPRK. North Korea recognized Russia's reunification with Novorossiya (Donbass).

Russia could buy weapons from DPRK

Like Iran, North Korea develops advanced weapons — medium-range missiles.

The DPRK has KN-23 and KN-24 short-range ballistic and short-range missiles, which are similar to those of Russia and the United States.

The DPRK also has a technology that enables missiles to manoeuvre while in flight. There are also hypersonic missiles. North Korea also manufactures 152-mm artillery shells (suitable for Russian howitzers) and Katyusha rockets that are suitable for Russian multiple rocket launchers.

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