Author`s name Timothy Bancroft-Hinchey

Cuba will study the effect of radio waves on health, climate and earthquakes

Cuban scientists are working together with specialists from the Autonomous University of Mexico to foster research on the effects of low frequencies, generated in the planet's spectrum, called Schumann resonance (SR). They investigated the effects of extremely low frequencies in disorders of the nervous system, climate change and seismic activity.

 Cuban scientists investigated the effects of extremely low frequencies generated in the planet's spectrum, called Schumann resonance (SR) in disorders of the nervous system, climate change and seismic activity, local media reported.

According to the technical manager of the radio astronomy station of the Institute of Geophysics and Astronomy, Cuba, Pablo Sierra, West Indian scientists working on a project in collaboration with the Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) seeks to place Cuba among the first countries in Latin America in promoting this type of research.

Sierra told Cuban media that the assembly of a modern station is expected in Havana to record the Schumann resonance, which will allow measurements to describe the influence of solar and geomagnetic activity.

He added that the proposed station will also use the information obtained from monitoring to study different periods of time, such as investigating episodes of epilepsy, he said. He also noted that the main frequency of RS coincides with the "alpha" frequency of the brain, described as electromagnetic waves that represent the activity of the cortex in a resting state, one of the parameters measured in the central nervous system.

Sierra said that in the world today, several studies have developed indicating the possibility of a relationship between some neurological conditions and the arrival on Earth of a flow of high-energy particles as a result of Sun storms during cycles of increased activity.

"This frequency is generated between the Earth and the ionosphere, in a series of electromagnetic waves, influenced by external action by the cosmic climate, mainly by solar activity," he added.

The Cuban researcher also noted that the Schumann Resonance is a kind of thermometer, whose frequency parameters allow the measurement of global temperature and climate variations, and even present the possibility of predicting large earthquakes.

He added that this research project with the Institute of Geophysics and Astronomy aims to obtain data useful in studying the effects of certain phenomena of the Sun, and may contribute to the prediction of global climate change, among other applications.

teleSUR



Translated from the Spanish version by:

Lisa Karpova
Pravda.Ru