Taliban attacks injure 4 in Afghanistan

Taliban militants attacked a police station west of Kabul and tried to assassinate a provincial police chief in a second attack, injuring four people, officials said Friday.

The World Food Program, meanwhile, warned that it would run out of supplies to feed 3.5 million Afghans if it didn't receive financial help.

"Our lack of funding has left us almost no choice, and food rations and activities will have to be cut if we do not receive fresh donations," said Charles Vincent, the WFP representative in Afghanistan.

A roadside bomb apparently meant for the police chief of Ghazni province, about 60 kilometers (40 miles) southwest of Kabul, injured the chief's driver and two bodyguards Friday, said Ahmad Jan, a police assistant. The chief was in Kabul when the bomb went off, Jan said.

Separately, militants using machine guns and rocket propelled grenades attacked a police headquarters late Thursday in the Jalrez district of Wardak province, about 30 kilometers (20 miles) west of Kabul, said Padcha Gul, deputy police chief of Wardak province. One policeman was injured in the firefight, he said.

Vincent said the WFP was worried it would not be able to pre-position 25,000 tons of food for isolated communities difficult to reach in the middle of winter.

The U.N. agency needs about US$40 million worth of food to supply its current operations through December, Vincent said in a statement Thursday.

Some of the Afghans that could be affected include poor school children who receive take-home food rations as an incentive to attend school, WFP said, reports the AP.

I.L.